Inspiring Enchantment & Illumination with Tarot & Intuitive Guidance

The Brilliant Jen Louden Explains Why It Matters

As you know, on the weekends, I usually share art, poetry, or views from other visionaries. Today’s post is certainly that, and more. You see, Jen Louden is one of my real SHE-roes.

She wrote The Woman’s Comfort Book back in 1992, which at times was my own hanging-on-by-my-fingernails survival manual through much of that decade.

It has become a classic for how to self-nurture, heal, and restore our balance in a frenetic, demanding world. Meantime, she has gone on to write many more books, a fabulous blog, teach amazing workshops and be a wise, funny, and unfailing champion for those of us who need to cultivate radical self-kindness, serenity, creative expression, and joy.

I love her work, I love her message, but I honestly was surprised to see her address the uniquely uncomfortable Occupy movement this week. I love her even more now. ~ Beth

Why Occupy Wall Street Matters to You

By Jennifer Louden
Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2011

Why does this global wave of demonstrations (951 cities in 82 countries this weekend) matter to you, right now, today, in your office or home, reading this?

Because it is calling you to ask yourself,  “Do I want to create a society based on selfishness and materialism or a society based on caring and equality?”

Occupy Wall Street is not about politics – not first.

It is about waking up and asking, “What is fair? What is right? What am I willing to do to take action on what I believe?”

We say we are all connected, we are all one, but do we act like it?

Occupy Wall Street is needling you with hope reunited with action.

It is asking you to turn away from apathy and despair.

It is telling you – with stinky chaotic in-your-face wildness – that the world has been for sale to the highest bidder for far too long.

You can watch from afar with detached curiosity.

You can let your politics (right or left) muddy the real questions.

You can let cynicism, busyness or fear keep you from engaging with what matters most to you – whether it’s pollution in your watershed or 300,000 teachers losing their jobs while Bank of America reported record profits for the 7th consecutive quarter.

You can dismiss this chaotic edge of change because it’s not branded and predigested and easy to understand in a sound bite.

I know there is a part of me that wants to. There is a part of me that wants change to be easy, pretty, and done.

But there is a bigger part of me that wants the peace and beauty and safety I experience every day – the golden light outside on the Japanese maple, the dogs curled by my feet, the sweet silence, the walk in the woods, enough good food to eat, the chance to write this to you – for all.

My request to you is simple: engage with this call. Read, talk to friends, grapple, go to the closest occupy movement and see for yourself but please don’t dismiss this.

Because we all want a world based on caring and equality.

Thank you.

Love,
Jen


ps: Jen’s followup blog post featuring Anne DeMarsay’s reworking of the classic The Revolution Will Not Be Televised is simply fantastic.  I highly recommend you pop over and soak up its wonderfulness.   ~ Beth

 

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  • October 22, 2011, 9:50 am Carey

    Beth, this is such an important article! She’s illuminated that fine, before this, invisible line that might separate us.Yesterday a photo circulated the facebook circuit which featured a letter from a college student. In it she states essentially “You are in your predicament because you are lazy, you should be more like me. I’m a college student and by my hard work I am debt-free, and I am not one of the 99%.” And I just sighed, because she is the person Goethe was speaking of in his quote. She would soon enter the work force, and then slowly realize that what people are saying is going on, is actually happening.

    Thank you for sharing this article. I’d probably never have seen it otherwise.

  • October 23, 2011, 9:17 am Otter

    Well said. Thanks for sharing this and for turning me onto Jennifer Louden!