Inspiring Enchantment & Illumination with Tarot & Intuitive Guidance

Jan. 13, 2007


The deepest secret in our heart of hearts is that… we love the world, and why not finally carry that secret on with our bodies into the living rooms and porches, backyards and grocery stores? — Natalie Goldberg

During this time of Winter, when we focus on the grounded, cozy energy of our homes, I’ve been sharing some ideas about using feng shui to enhance the energy, called the Qi, of your home.

Feng shui practitioners believe that the best way to attract love is to adjust your environment accordingly. In the past couple of days, I’ve discussed easy changes you can make in your front entry and bedroom. For instance, feng shui consultant Stephanie Dempsey writes, “Dingy surroundings, piles of clutter, and self-absorbed artwork can actually drive Cupid from your door.” She offers some simple ways to use feng shui around the house, to help you find your ideal partner, or else increase the passion in your long-term relationship or marriage.

First, take a look at the artwork in your home. Where possible, replace images of lone figures with pictures of happy couples. Stephanie explains that artwork has a tremendous impact on the subconscious. When you surround yourself with photos, paintings, sculptures, and knickknacks of solitary figures, you’ll carry yourself accordingly. Replacing such images with representations of tender couples will make you more receptive to love.

She also advises that you create cozy seating arrangements, throughout the house. Single chairs send a loud and clear message to prospective suitors and spouses: leave me alone. If you’re looking for love, create conversation and snuggling friendly arrangements with love seats, sofas, and chairs. Putting chairs at comfortable angles to each other will signal that you’re ready for a relationship.

And keep the television out of the bedroom. Nothing kills romance like the drone of late night television. If you have trouble falling asleep, try unwinding by reading love poetry or romantic novels. Your subconscious will shift accordingly.

By the way, be sure you have pulled your bed away from the wall so that there is ample room to walk on either side. Otherwise you are sending out loud signals that your bed is only for you.

Exposed joists or beams in the house are popular for creating architectural interest or a rustic ambiance, but in feng shui they are thought to be “poison arrows,” bringing oppressive Qi that breeds distrust and dishonesty. If possible, do not have exposed beams above the bed, as they can cause chronic, oppressive feelings of fatigue – not exactly what you want to be feeling with your partner!

To remedy this problem, hang two bamboo flutes facing each other from the beam. The flutes should be tilted upward to draw the Qi up and down, breaking the straight-across beam energy. And then tie some red threads around the low end of the flutes. Bamboo wind chimes are also helpful. Their hollow rods will force the Qi energy to rise through the rods, while the tinkling sound of the chime causes the energy to be auspicious.

And while of course you love them, keep the rest of your family out. Your bedroom represents your romantic life, so you and your lover probably don’t really want to look up and see dear old Aunt Elsie peering down at you, or photos of your mom and dad. Children’s artwork and toys will also undermine your sex life. Celebrate these relationships in other areas of your household, but keep your boudoir a private, adult retreat.

Finally, think pink! Shades of pink especially flatter all skin tones, and warm colors like pink and red can enliven your love life considerably. By the way, forget the stereotypes – they don’t have to be overly sweet or feminine. Soft shades of rose, salmon, and coral are very versitile, and can attract a gentle, confident partner who is attentive to your needs. On the other hand, bold colors like scarlet, crimson, and burgundy will draw a passionate adventurer to your side.

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